Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Bottled Poetry - SOLD


"Wine is bottled poetry"
~Robert Louis Stevenson

I'm going to be doing a number of wine/wine related paintings in the coming weeks, and this is the first one. I have the pleasure of living smack in the middle of wine region - wineries seem to be on every corner : )
6" x 6" / oil on panel 

9 comments:

Lisa Riehl said...

Great rendition of the bottles, love the different greens and reds. Beautiful!

Ray said...

Thank you.
Now I understand "poetry in motion,"
The "pfop" of the cork,
The pour to the glass,
The sip
The bouquet
The nose and
The slide
As it smoothly and slowly
Follows the throat.
'Right on' RLS, and Kimmer.

ps.
and a nice job on the the bottles. I love the caps.

Ralph said...

Hi Kim. I noticed you were now following one of my blogs so I popped along to see who you were and what you were doing. So glad I did I just love those bottles and all the lovely thoughts thing bring to mind. There is nothing more relaxing than a beautiful wine in good company. But to be able to take that a stage further and make the bottles art is even better. I also love you rendering of the pansy it almose smiles at me from the screen. I am going to follow your blog because I am sure I am going to learn and also be stimulated by you.

Tammy Hext said...

These bottles rock Kim - well done!

Jeffrey J. Boron said...

Wow you sure nailed that bottle green Kim...lovely. Beautiful painterly job...love the brush strokes!!
(can we have more please?)

Jeffrey

Pam Holnback said...

The tops of these are so well done. Great job w/ the elipses.

Jade said...

So beautiful! I especially love the glass, very rich. Gowhgus darlin, just gowhgus! ;)
<3

Sheila said...

Wow Kim, this painting reads much larger than the 6x6 size it's painted on. The color for the wine bottle is right on and I love how you were able to render them in minimal strokes. Are you going to show these to the wineries so they could perhaps show them in their tasting rooms?

Gwen Bell said...

Great crop and I love the way you "got" the hardness of the glass with such an efficiency of strokes. Great job!